The Other Hobbies – Video Games

To know me is to understand I have quite a few different hobbies that I ping-pong between on any given day. Presumably, you’re here because of woodworking. Today I talk about video games – my general history and recent events.

Being a child of the 80s of decent means, my family bought a PC for me to learn on and play the occasional game. In my case there were a couple. I assume the first one was a Texas Instruments TI99/4a because it was released first. I learned BASIC, I played games like Parsec and ZeroZap. Then there was the Apple IIc where I played Lemonade Stand and countless others. I think the first dedicated console we had was an Atari 2600, which had it’s charms.

The first real foray into video games for me though was the Game Boy. I had one near launch and played so many games that I can’t remember them all. Occasionally I’ll get a faint memory and try to pull on it to see what title it was. I had a ton of accessories for it too. I took it everywhere, and while the handheld and the accessories have been lost to time, we did hold onto most of the games and I took those back last year into my collection.

The real star of the show, though, was when we bought a Sega Saturn. This would be the hook that has kept me around. Need for Speed was a highlight, as was Daytona USA and World Series Baseball ’98 (it had Atlanta Braves star Chipper Jones on the cover). The game of the console for me though was Road Rash.

Road Rash was such a formative game, and in all likelihood my most played while the Saturn was our only console. Moreover, it introduced me to my favorite band of all time, Soundgarden. I had just really found my niche in music only two years earlier in 1994, catching on with bands like Stone Temple Pilots, Pearl Jam, etc. STP was a drug for me, but it wouldn’t hold a candle to what I eventually found in Soundgarden. Just hearing the intro to Rusty Cage takes me back to August 1996.

So that month would prove to be one to shape my life for over thirty years now. I still love video games, I still love hard hitting music, and I feel the need to break out the Saturn every now and again to scratch an itch. It isn’t the original one we bought because it broke, but I’ve had this replacement one now for sixteen years. Around this time I got a Playstation and actually got to keep it in my room, soon after upgrading to the PS2 with it’s DVD player. The Saturn largely fell to the wayside after this due to the various failings of SEGA and the lack of content.

From there it went. In 2004 I bought my Xbox, which introduced me to Microsoft’s vision of what a console was. Upgrades to Playstation and Xbox came. I also started buying the consoles I missed out on originally. The SNES, N64, the Gamecube. I had Master System games I couldn’t even play. I got into the Dreamcast. Shortly after the kids arrived, and I sold off the Nintendo consoles when I bought the Wii. I’ve purchased every single console since.

Well, in 2019 I decided I would buy back those classic consoles I previously sold and more. I kept the Dreamcast and Saturn, plus the old 2600, but sold everything else what wasn’t current. So I spent quite a bit of time on eBay and in local stores buying pretty much what I could find and afford easily.

Now, I have pretty much every mainstream console made since 1977. I also have several of the “Classic” consoles, updated flash versions of the older consoles with built-in games made by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, and now Neo Geo and NEC. I also have an Nvidia Shield TV and a couple of Rasberry Pis to allow emulation whenever I want. And of course the handhelds, including several DS/3DS, a couple of PSPs, a Vita, and an emulation handheld in the style of that original Game Boy that houses a Raspberry Pi.

What I don’t always have though, is time to play them or display them properly. A nice cabinet would go a long way…

 

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